Articles Posted in Hit-and-Run Accidents

Truck  accidents can be extremely traumatizing and often involve serious injuries or even deaths. This experience can be doubly difficult when the culpable party does not stay at the scene of the accident. New Mexico law mandates that individuals who are involved in an accident must stop their vehicles and, if possible, move their cars to a place where they are least likely to cause further delays or accidents. The driver must provide their name, address, and identifying information to any law enforcement and the injured party. Furthermore, the state requires that if another party is injured, the culpable party must provide “reasonable assistance” to the victim. This may be acts such as calling emergency personnel or even taking the injured party to the hospital.

Semi-TrucksA hit-and-run occurs when the culpable party does not engage in the above behaviors but rather leaves the scene of the accident. Participating in a hit-and-run can lead to criminal repercussions in addition to civil lawsuits, fines, and penalties.

Sadly, in these situations, the burden is put on the victim or a witness to provide pertinent information to law enforcement. However, in many situations, the victim is not in a position to jot down a license plate number or identifying information. It is very important that victims immediately contact law enforcement when they are involved in a hit-and-run because time is of the essence in these sorts of cases.

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Every state in the United States has a law that outlines the repercussions for those who are found liable in a hit-and-run accident. Generally, hit-and-runs are accidents in which a person hits another vehicle, a pedestrian, or property and leaves the scene without attempting to call emergency personnel or render assistance. It also may include a failure to exchange information, even if no one is hurt in the accident.

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Under New Mexico law, specifically statute 66-7-203, the driver of a vehicle that is involved in any accident that causes an injury or death must comply with certain very specific requirements. First, the individual must provide their name, address, and registration number to the individual who was hit or any law enforcement authority that requests this information. Furthermore, the individual who collided with the injured party must attempt to render reasonable assistance. This usually means that they must call emergency personnel or make arrangements for carrying the individual to a hospital for treatment.

Unlike many other offenses, a hit-and-run does not necessarily include the element of fault. This means the violation occurs when a person leaves the scene of the accident, regardless of their level of fault in the initial incident. Thus, a driver can be found liable for a hit-and-run even for an accident they did not cause.

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